Archive for September 2009

San Jose 2006 Mayoral Primary Vote by Precinct: Chavez

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Chavez generally did best in central San Jose. This should be no surprise. The District 3 city council seat, which she occupied,  forms the core of the area. In addition, the demographics were her core demographics and her

Precincts are sorted by quintiles based on level of support. The colors are arranged on a five-point color scale with blue being the highest level of support and red being lowest level of support:
Blue: Greatest support (28% to 100%)
Green: Next greatest support (23% to 28%)
Yellow: Average support (19% to 23%)
Orange: Next least support (15% to 19%)
Red: Least support (0% to 15%)

Sources of data: University of California at Berkeley, Institute of Government Affairs, Statewide Database; Santa Clara County Registrar of Voters.

2008 Oregon Democratic Primary: Party Switcher Voting Share by County

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This post is part of a series on the 2008 Oregon Democratic Primary.

This map represents the relative share of the total number of 2008 Oregon Democratic Primary voters who were Party Switchers (see below for definition). The map ranges from red to blue. Red is a higher percentage and blue is a lower percentage.

Party switchers formed a much higher percentage of the Democratic Primary votes in the western part of the state. Switchers were also a larger share in the counties with significant shares of high-tech industries in their local economies, such as Benton and Washington.

The four categories of 2008 Oregon Democratic Primary voters are:
Persistent: Long-term Democrats who voted in the 2004 and/or 2006 primary and voted in the 2008 Primary (55% of the total voters).
Non-Persistent: Long-term Democrats who voted in neither the 2004 nor the 2006 primary and voted in the 2008 Primary (29% of the total voters).
Switchers: Long-term voters who switched from another registration category to vote as Democrats in the 2008 Primary (9% of the total voters).
New Voters: Voters who registered after February 1, 2008 and voted in the 2008 Primary (8% of the total voters).

Sources of data: Oregon Secretary of State and Labels and Lists.

National Vote for President, 1920-1940

This chart takes a different approach to the vote for President from 1920 through 1940. Most often historians and political scientists look at the vote in percentage terms. Here, we’ll look at it in actual numbers.

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Two basic patterns stand out: First, the Republican vote totals in 1920, 1924, 1932, and 1936 were roughly the same. Only the 1928 and 1940 elections, which were themselves roughly the same, stood out above these levels. Second, the Democratic vote total began a steep rise in 1928 that coninued until 1936 where it hit a plateau.

This chart shows that the Roosevelt landslides of 1932 and 1936 were built, at least in part, by substantial numbers of new voters who voted Democratic for President.

This post will begin a series on various aspects of Great Depression and New Deal politics that will be presented in coming weeks.

During the next few weeks, Friday posts will look at the trends for Multnomah County. In particular, the analysis will go deeper than just the numbers for President. It will examine how the Great Depression and related New Deal politics affected voter registration and the contests for Congress and state legislature. Multnomah County is a good case study because, at this time, the old 3rd Congressional District, state senate and state house district lines followed county boundaries.

This chart follows an approach taken by Andersen (Kristi Andersen, The Creation of a Democratic Majority 1928-1936, The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1979.).

Source of data: Yanek Mieczkowski, The Routledge Historical Atlas of Presidential Elections, Mark C. Carnes, ser. ed., Routledge, New York, 2001.

San Jose 2006 Mayoral Primary Vote by Precinct: Reed

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Reed did well in several areas in the city: north, central, and south.

Note that some of the outlying areas are not heavily populated, so there is an apparent concentration of opposition in the far south.

Precincts are sorted by quintiles based on level of support. The colors are arranged on a five-point color scale with blue being the highest level of support and red being lowest level of support:
Blue: Greatest support (32% to 100%)
Green: Next greatest support (26% to 32%)
Yellow: Average support (22% to 26%)
Orange: Next least support (19% to 22%)
Red: Least support (0% to 19%)

Sources of data: University of California at Berkeley, Institute of Government Affairs, Statewide Database; Santa Clara County Registrar of Voters.