Posts tagged ‘1914 Election’

Oregon 1914 Statewide Election Results: Single Tax Measure

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The Single Tax was William S. U’Ren’s most famous proposal. It was designed to change Oregon’s economy and society. It had failed in previous years. This time supporters renamed it and its support increased, but not enough to pass.

MEASURE 14: $1500 Tax Exemption Amendment

REFERRED BY INITIATIVE
FAILED

TAX EXEMPTION AMENDMENT. Its purpose is to exempt from assessment and taxation, dwelling houses, household furniture, live stock, machinery, orchard trees, vines, bushes, shrubs, nursery stock, merchandise, buildings and other improvements on, in and under lands made by clearing, ditching and draining, but not to exempt the land; it is intended to exempt up to $1,500, all kinds of personal property and land improvements of all kinds, but the land itself shall be assessed.

Key: Yes percentage in 10 percent increments from 0-10 at far left through 90-100 at far right. Darker indicates a higher yes percentage.

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Oregon 1914 Statewide Election Results: Foreign Voting Measure

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It might seem strange today, but. until 1914, certain foreign citizens could vote in Oregon’s elections. This had been true since Oregon became a state. This right was taken away, in an election where foreigners could vote, in a landslide.

MEASURE 1: Requiring Voters to be Citizens of the United States

REFERRED BY LEGISLATURE
PASSED

FOR AMENDMENT of Section 2 of Article II of the Constitution of Oregon, so as to require voters to be citizens of the United States, in all elections, unless otherwise provided for in the Constitution.

Key: Yes percentage in 10 percent increments from 0-10 at far left through 90-100 at far right. Darker indicates a higher yes percentage.

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Oregon 1914 Statewide Election Results: 8-Hour Day Measure

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This is a sign of how far things have changed. The universal 8-hour day measure failed. It was roundly criticized by major newspapers.

In fairness, it should be noted that the measure was a radical change at the time.

MEASURE 11: Universal Constitutional Eight Hour Day Amendment REFERRED BY INITIATIVE FAILED CONSTITUTIONAL EIGHT HOUR DAY AMENDMENT. Its purpose is to add Section 9 to Article XV of the Oregon Constitution prohibiting any man, woman, boy or girl, from being employed more than eight hours in anyone day, or forty-eight hours in anyone week, in any trade, business or profession, 01′ on any farm, or in domestic service, or in any kind of employment whatever, skilled 01′ unskilled, mental 01′ physical, within the State of Oregon. This law applies to children and other relatives of the employers, and provides penalty for violation thereof. Key: Yes percentage in 10 percent increments from 0-10 at far left through 90-100 at far right. Darker indicates a higher yes percentage. image002

Oregon 1914 Statewide Election Results: Death Penalty Measure

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Oregon abolished the death penalty in 1914. Support for its abolition was relatively evenly distributed throughout the state. The death penalty had survived a statewide vote in 1912 by a landslide. This time women had the vote and it narrowly lost.

MEASURE 18: Abolishing Death Penalty

REFERRED BY INITIATIVE
PASSED by 175 votes statewide

ABOLISHING DEATH PENALTY. Its purpose is to abolish the death penalty for murder committed in the State of Oregon and fixing life imprisonment as the maximum punishment for any crime. It repeals all provisions of the Constitution and laws in conflict with the same.

Key: Yes percentage in 10 percent increments from 0-10 at far left through 90-100 at far right. Darker indicates a higher yes percentage.

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The Difference in 100 Years: Prohibition and Legalized Marijuana

It seems Oregonians have always been willing to experiment. One hundred years ago Monday, Oregonians passed a state prohibition constitutional amendment (see http://lindholmcompanyblog.com/?p=11038). It was part of a national movement. Oregon was one of four states that day to pass it that particular day. The federal constitutional amendment was added a few years later in 1920. However, in a complete reversal, the national amendment was resoundingly repealed in 1933.

Tuesday, Oregonians went in the opposite direction. They legalized marijuana. Advocates of legalization have long argued that marijuana laws were a kind of prohibition – not a favorable comparison. Similar to what happened with prohibition, marijuana legalization was expanded in other parts of the country the same day as Oregon’s vote.

Both were approved with approximately the same level of support. Statewide, prohibition was passed with 58 percent and marijuana was legalized with, it appears now, about 55 percent. The question now is how well will this particular experiment go.

Oregon Voted for Prohibition 100 Years Ago Today

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Key: Yes percentage in 10 percent increments from 0-10 at far left through 90-100 at far right. Darker indicates a higher yes percentage.

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Prohibition was passed and added to the Oregon Constitution in 1914 after falling short previously. The local option had passed and been added to Oregon’s laws a few years earlier. Prohibition was added to the United States Constitution in 1920 and repealed in 1933.

Above is a map of the voting percentages for yes by county. The key is below.

As one can see, Multnomah County was the least supportive among Oregon’s counties. This fit with the national pattern. Prohibition typically did better in rural areas and worse in urban areas.

MORE ABOUT THE 1914 ELECTION COMING

MEASURE DETAILS:

MEASURE 17: Prohibition Constitutional Amendment

REFERRED BY INITIATIVE
PASSED

PROHIBITION CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT. Its purpose is to prohibit after January first, 1916, the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors within the State of Oregon, except upon prescription of a physician, or for scientific, sacramental or mechanical purposes.