Posts tagged ‘2011 Redistricting’

An Early Look at North Carolina Redistricting (2008 Census Estimates)

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This map provides a preliminary look, based on 2008 data, of how state legislative seats will be shifted due to the 2011 redistricting. The more red the county the greater (hotter) the percentage increase or the more blue the smaller (cooler) the percentage increase in estimated population between the 2000 Census and the July 1, 2008 population estimate. Please keep in mind, first, that the map presents are only relative changes and, second, that geographic size does not always correlate to population size.

The counties expected to gain the most representation in the state legislature are (in house seats):
Wake  191%
Mecklenburg 122%
Union   67%
Johnston  31%
Brunswick  25%
Cabarrus  24%

The counties expected to lose the most representation in the state legislature are (in house seats):
Cumberland -45%
Wayne  -21%

The congressional district and senate district gains and losses would be proportionate, only smaller.

Please remember that redistricting can be a quirky process and that these estimates are population weights only, not measurements of actual political power after the redistricting process. Future posts are planned that will provide updated information and analysis as the 2011 reapportionment approaches.

Source of data: U. S. Census
Estimates of congressional seat gains and losses: Polidata, 12/23/09 press release.

An Early Look at Ohio Redistricting (2008 Census Estimates)

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This map provides a preliminary look, based on 2008 data, of how state legislative seats will be shifted due to the 2011 redistricting. The more red the county the greater (hotter) the percentage increase or the more blue the smaller (cooler) the percentage increase in estimated population between the 2000 Census and the July 1, 2008 population estimate. Please keep in mind, first, that the map presents are only relative changes and, second, that geographic size does not always correlate to population size.

The counties expected to gain the most representation in the state legislature are (in house seats):
Delaware 46%
Franklin 41%
Warren  41%
Butler  21%
Medina  16%
Fairfield 16%
Lorain  14%
Clermont 13%

The counties expected to lose the most representation in the state legislature are (in house seats):
Cuyahoga -109%
Montgomery  -27%
Mahoning  -19%
Lucas   -17%
Trumbull  -14%

The senate’s gains and losses would be proportionate, only smaller.

Ohio is expected to lose two congressional districts.
Despite the loss statewide, there would be some counties that would actually gain congressional representation.
The counties with the greatest gain would be:
Delaware 6%
Warren  4%

The counties with the greatest loss would be:
Cuyahoga -42%
Hamilton -15%
Montgomery -14%
Franklin -12%
Lucas  -11%
Summit  -10%

Please remember that redistricting can be a quirky process and that these estimates are population weights only, not measurements of actual political power after the redistricting process. Future posts are planned that will provide updated information and analysis as the 2011 reapportionment approaches.

Source of data: U. S. Census
Estimates of congressional seat gains and losses: Polidata, 12/23/09 press release.

An Early Look at Pennsylvania Redistricting (2008 Census Estimates)

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This map provides a preliminary look, based on 2008 data, of how state legislative seats will be shifted due to the 2011 redistricting. The more red the county the greater (hotter) the percentage increase or the more blue the smaller (cooler) the percentage increase in estimated population between the 2000 Census and the July 1, 2008 population estimate. Please keep in mind, first, that the map presents are only relative changes and, second, that geographic size does not always correlate to population size.

The counties expected to gain the most representation in the state legislature are (in house seats):
Chester  85%
York  61%
Lancaster 41%
Berks  41%
Monroe  40%
Northampton 39%
Lehigh  39%
Montgomery 29%
Bucks  26%
Cumberland 21%
Pike  21%
Franklin 20%

The counties expected to lose the most representation in the state legislature are (in house seats):
Philadelphia -148%
Allegheny -137%

The senate’s gains and losses would be proportionate, only smaller.

Pennsylvania is expected to lose one congressional district.
Despite the loss statewide, there would be some counties that would actually gain congressional representation.
The counties with the greatest gain would be:
Chester 4%
Monroe 2%
York 2%

The counties with the greatest loss would be:
Philadelphia -25%
Allegheny -23%
Essentially, the big cities would lose the most representation.

Please remember that redistricting can be a quirky process and that these estimates are population weights only, not measurements of actual political power after the redistricting process. Future posts are planned that will provide updated information and analysis as the 2011 reapportionment approaches.

Source of data: U. S. Census
Estimates of congressional seat gains and losses: Polidata, 12/23/09 press release.

An Early Look at California Redistricting (2008 Census Estimates)

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This map provides a preliminary look, based on 2008 data, of how state legislative seats will be shifted due to the 2011 redistricting. The more red the county the greater (hotter) the percentage increase or the more blue the smaller (cooler) the percentage increase in estimated population between the 2000 Census and the July 1, 2008 population estimate. Please keep in mind, first, that the map presents are only relative changes and, second, that geographic size does not always correlate to population size.

The counties expected to gain the most representation in the state legislature are (in assembly seats):
Riverside 92%
San Bernardino 35%
Kern  18%
Placer  16%
Sacramento 14%
San Joaquin 13%

The counties expected to lose the most representation in the state legislature are (in assembly seats):
Los Angeles -102%
Alameda   -20%
Orange   -17%
Santa Clara  -13%
San Mateo  -12%
San Diego  -11%

Essentially, an assembly seat will move from Los Angeles County a bit south to Riverside County.
The senate’s gains and losses would be proportionate, only smaller.

No change is expected in the number of California congressional districts.

Please remember that redistricting can be a quirky process and that these estimates are population weights only, not measurements of actual political power after the redistricting process. Future posts are planned that will provide updated information and analysis as the 2011 reapportionment approaches.

Source of data: U. S. Census
Estimates of congressional seat gains and losses: Polidata, 12/23/09 press release.

An Early Look at Washington Redistricting (2008 Census Estimates)

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This map provides a preliminary look, based on 2008 data, of how state legislative seats will be shifted due to the 2011 redistricting. The more red the county the greater (hotter) the percentage increase or the more blue the smaller (cooler) the percentage increase in estimated population between the 2000 Census and the July 1, 2008 population estimate. Please keep in mind, first, that the map presents are only relative changes and, second, that geographic size does not always correlate to population size.

The counties expected to gain the most representation in the state legislature are (in legislative districts):
Clark  31%
Franklin 13%
Thurston 11%
Whatcom   8%
Snohomish  8%

The counties expected to lose the most representation in the state legislature are (in legislative districts):
King  -41%
Kitsap  -13%
Yakima  -10%
It is possible that Washington will gain one congressional district.
If so, the counties with the greatest gain would be:
King  21%
Pierce  13%
Clark  12%
Snohomish 12%

If so, the counties with the greatest loss would be in the smaller counties.

Please remember that redistricting can be a quirky process and that these estimates are population weights only, not measurements of actual political power after the redistricting process. Future posts are planned that will provide updated information and analysis as the 2011 reapportionment approaches.

Source of data: U. S. Census
Estimates of congressional seat gains and losses: Polidata, 12/23/09 press release.

An Early Look at Illinois Redistricting (2008 Census Estimates)

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 This map provides a preliminary look, based on 2008 data, of how state legislative seats will be shifted due to the 2011 redistricting. The more red the county the greater (hotter) the percentage increase or the more blue the smaller (cooler) the percentage increase in estimated population between the 2000 Census and the July 1, 2008 population estimate. Please keep in mind, first, that the map presents are only relative changes and, second, that geographic size does not always correlate to population size.

The counties expected to gain the most representation in the state legislature are (in house seats):
Will  158%
Kane   87%
Macoupin  48%
Kendall   46%
La Salle  43%

The counties expected to lose the most representation in the state legislature are (in house seats):
Cook  -289%
Marion   -11%
DuPage    -9%
Rock Island   -8%
Peoria    -7%
Vermilion   -6%
Knox    -6%

The senate’s gains and losses would be proportionate, only smaller.

Illinois is expected to lose one congressional district.
Despite the loss statewide, there would be some counties that would actually gain congressional representation.
The counties with the greatest gain would be:
Will  18%
Kane   9%
Kendall   6%
Macoupin  5%

The counties with the greatest loss would be:
Cook -84%
DuPage  -9%
Essentially, Chicago would lose a congressional district and the rest of the state would keep its congressional representation.

Please remember that redistricting can be a quirky process and that these estimates are population weights only, not measurements of actual political power after the redistricting process. Future posts are planned that will provide updated information and analysis as the 2011 reapportionment approaches.

Source of data: U. S. Census
Estimates of congressional seat gains and losses: Polidata, 12/23/09 press release.

An Early Look at Oregon Redistricting (2008 Census Estimates)

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This map provides a preliminary look, based on 2008 data, of how state legislative seats will be shifted due to the 2011 redistricting. The more red the county the greater (hotter) the percentage increase or the more blue the smaller (cooler) the percentage increase in estimated population between the 2000 Census and the July 1, 2008 population estimate. Please keep in mind, first, that the map presents are only relative changes and, second, that geographic size does not always correlate to population size.

The counties expected to gain the most representation in the state legislature are (in house seats):
Washington 57% of a state house seat.
Deschutes 49% of a state house seat.
Polk  13% of a state house seat.
Clackamas  9% of a state house seat.

The counties expected to lose the most representation in the state legislature are (in house seats):
Multnomah -27% of a state house seat.
Lane  -18% of a state house seat.
Douglas  -11% of a state house seat.
Coos  -10% of a state house seat.

The senate’s gains and losses would be proportionate, only smaller.

It is possible that Oregon will gain one congressional district.
If so, the counties with the greatest gain would be the larger counties:
Washington 19% of a congressional seat.
Multnomah 17% of a congressional seat.
Clackamas 11% of a congressional seat.
Deschutes  8% of a congressional seat.
Marion   8% of a congressional seat.
Lane   8% of a congressional seat.
Jackson   5% of a congressional seat.

The increase in representation would counterbalance the relative population losses in comparison to other counties.

These counties would lose representation, though the loss would be less than 0.5% of a congressional seat.
Gilliam
Grant
Harney
Sherman
Wheeler

Please remember that redistricting can be a quirky process and that these estimates are population weights only, not measurements of actual political power after the redistricting process. Future posts are planned that will provide updated information and analysis as the 2011 reapportionment approaches.

Source of data: U. S. Census
Estimates of congressional seat gains and losses: Polidata, 12/23/09 press release.