Posts tagged ‘Oregon Labor Market’

2008 Other Oregon Income Distribution

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The red line shows the share of income held by each centile (1%) of population. A perfectly egalitarian distribution would follow the 45 degree blue line from the lower left corner to the upper right corner.

Any real world distibution would fall short. The question is how much. The Gini coefficient measures the amount of area between perfect equality (the 45 degree blue line) and the actual distribution of income along the red line.

The Gini coefficient for the State of Oregon in 2008 equalled 0.45.

The Other Oregon, as defined here, includes everything except Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties.

Source of data: 2008 American Community Survey, Public Use Micro Sample.

2008 Portland Metro Income Distribution

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The red line shows the share of income held by each centile (1%) of population. A perfectly egalitarian distribution would follow the 45 degree blue line from the lower left corner to the upper right corner.

Any real world distibution would fall short. The question is how much. The Gini coefficient measures the amount of area between perfect equality (the 45 degree blue line) and the actual distribution of income along the red line.

The Gini coefficient for the Portland Metro Area in 2008 equalled 0.45.

The Portland Metro, as defined here, includes Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties.

Source of data: 2008 American Community Survey, Public Use Micro Sample.

2008 Oregon Statewide Income Distribution

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The red line shows the share of income held by each centile (1%) of population. A perfectly egalitarian distribution would follow the 45 degree blue line from the lower left corner to the upper right corner.

Any real world distibution would fall short. The question is how much. The Gini coefficient measures the amount of area between perfect equality (the 45 degree blue line) and the actual distribution of income along the red line.

The Gini coefficient for the State of Oregon in 2008 equalled 0.45.

Source of data: 2008 American Community Survey, Public Use Micro Sample.

Oregon by Region: Average Income by Age, 2008

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This post chops the Oregon sample into two parts to look at income by age. The two parts are Tri-County (Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington Counties) and what is commonly known as the “Other Oregon,” which is everywhere else in the state.

The more urban Tri-County area has higher mean incomes at nearly every age.

Important characteristics, which are true for nearly every population in a 20th century developed country, are a generally increasing curve, a peak near retirement age, and  more urban areas generally have higher incomes than more rural areas. The division between urban and rural areas may be more or less dramatic depending on how well the economy is integrated.

The graphic shows household mean income by age in Oregon estimated based on the most recent American Community Survey data.

For the statewide pattern, please see: http://lindholmcompanyblog.com/?p=3950.

Source: American Community Survey Population and Housing Public Use Microsample files, 2008 1-year sample.

Oregon Statewide Average Income by Age, 2008

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The graphic shows household mean income by age in Oregon estimated based on the most recent American Community Survey data.

Two important characteristics, which are true for nearly every population in a 20th century developed country, is a generally increasing curve and a peak near retirement age. 

Source: American Community Survey Population and Housing Public Use Microsample files, 2008 1-year sample.